Golden Birthday Boy

On a warm summer night, December 09, 1965, a baby boy was born. Hopefully bringing joy to his parents, family, friends, and students.

Needless to say,  many things have happened over the past half century. Things that as a little boy in Brazil I would not even have dared to dream. But God has been good all the time.

Now –  50 years old – 32 of which, working as a language teacher. Yes, I’ve been a program director, teacher trainer, etc, but never forsook the calling to be a teacher with all the simplicity and complexity that career choice entails.

Time to stop and ponder what I would have done differently and I can confidently say, nothing, both professionally and personally.  I consider myself extremely happy or blessed (yes, now I don’t have to  be afraid to say that word) and grateful for the many blessings the good Lord has poured down on me.

Retire? As long as I have breath and mental and physical conditions I intend to continue sharing a little of the experience of learning a language with whomever is willing to work with me. IMG_4917.JPG

What lies ahead? Only the good Lord knows but he’s promised each one of us that “his plans are to prosper us and not to harm us, plans to give us hope and a future” (Jeremiah 29:11).

I don’t see myself getting a red convertible in a middle age crisis.  Streaking across a football field?  Well…, maybe, but whatever comes my way, may the Lord help me to appreciate each day as a unique gift. IMG_9738.JPG

As John Lennon wisely said:

“Count your age by friends, not years. Count your life by smiles, not tears.”

Cheers and Happy New Year,

Mo

 

 

CLOTHES MAKE THE MAN, THE MONK AND THE TEACHER

Having taught all sorts of students along the years, ranging from athletes and high school students to top executives in Brazil, the US and Ireland I have grown to appreciate the importance of how the teacher dresses himself. Nothing fancy, but a smart casual as they say in the UK and Ireland would be perfectly fitting for most occasions.

Clothes do make the man, the monk and the teacher
Clothes do make the man, the monk and the teacher

Of course, common sense rules, but what I’ve observed along my career with other teachers of English as a second or foreign language is that many don’t care about how they are dressed. They’ve embraced that “raggedy doll look” of torn jeans and a T-shirt although much appealing as a uniform they might be, I don’t think they are the right fit for a meeting room. There’s a case of a teacher who, not satisfied with the piercing and the tattoos, (not there’s anything wrong with them), also wears a bloody cap. DURING CLASS – INDOORS.  hello… has he not had time to comb his braids?

So, my advice to any teacher is:

1. dress properly (not talking about designer clothes)

2. Cleanliness is next to godliness (I kid you not)

3. Take off that bloody cap once indoors.

Good lessons to you all,

Cheers,

Mo